A BLOG

A BLOG

Sunday, July 29, 2012

An issue.


All kinda stuff which intoxicates  is strictly  forbidden in Islam. Booze is forbidden. A big way!
( Mind it, I am not  saying all Muslims are saints. Just the thing is that majority of  them are fundamentalist. Being extremist and being fundamentalist are two different thing. They follow religion strictly, and touchy about it)

On the other hand, many non-Muslim assume  Ramadan is some kinda festival.

NO, it ain't.

It is a holy month of fasting, where Muslim fast  from dawn to dusk. It is not just that they stop themselves  eating and drinking water and other permitted stuff  in that duration, there is a lot more. And at night they do mass prayers. This is considered one of very blessed month .They fast, and pray.

And when we say Ramadan party, it only means inviting friends, and family out,  breaking fats together, and after Al-Magrib salah  dinner. Mostly people rush after it for Al-Esha salah and Taraweeh. So this is Ramadan party.

So meaning to say when Muslim can't drink in normal days. They can't do this in Ramadan.

It figures why normal Emiratries outraged at  the  Tweet feed about  an  article "Bars for Ramadan " published by  Time out Dubai. (The article has been pulled down after raged)

It was giving a different picture, a picture which is telling to check out 5 bars during  Ramadan. What else?

 OK,  be neutral for  a jiff  what does this tittle " Bars for Ramadan"  saying to you ?


This is not small thing for normal Muslims. They find that article literally disrespectful. They ganged up against the TOD and started a campaign on tweeter .

 So those who are saying Emaratis has freaked out on this issue, are totally unclear about the matter. I agree non-Muslim don't get it that easily. But the problem is that  the writer wrote, what he saw.

He/ she  was unaware.

This happens in Dubai.

That article was actually for expats  in UAE. as we know  large number of expat are living there and actually enjoying Ramadan. Sahoor and Iftar times are clubbing night out thing for expat over there. For them it is some kinda festival. And yes, why they stop going bar and doing what they want.

 If you check out Time out Dubai website there are lots of  like Sahoor, Iftar and dinners where foreigner are posing, and enjoying PARTYY!!

So both parties are off hooked in my eyes.

24 comments:

  1. Izdiher, thanks for enlightening the unenlightened...me! Not a student of Religious practices, I don't know anything about anything
    in these matters.

    However, I believe all Peeps who are honest, and fear NOT their humanness, are willing to learn about other cultures, other methods of praying, adoration, praise and practice.

    Again, no matter what peeps may think, say, write, or comment...you tell things from your heart. This is usual for you, and that is why you have such a loyal following. Peeps don't always get from you that "hard, Party Line" of intolerance and lack of understanding.

    BTW, in case it does not resemble such, these comments of mine are 'congratulations' for good work, in writing, thinking, and living.

    My own belief is that our God is less concerned with our observation of all the man-made rules--as He (Allah) is with what is in our MINDS AND HEARTS!

    Blessings.
    PEACE!

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  2. I totally understand that! Us Mormons aren't supposed to partake in any thing like drinking, drugs or any form of intoxicants like that.. That's because we consider our bodies a temple.. and we try to take care of our bodies as much as we can, but I still drink coffee.. IT's the caffeine that's frowned upon. Some who like coffee just get the decaffeinated but I have to have some caffeine in the morning or I get a little grouchy!! LOL!

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  3. I just choose not to drink alcohol or caffeine because it is bad for the body. I appreciated knowing more about how Muslims believe. Thanks for sharing my friend-

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  4. Well there are many issues in Dubai , I don't like this country much. intoxicants is definitely prohibited due to many many reasons... Jazakallah khair for the post. Btw, I was actually waiting for a post from you today because strangely I had a dream that your house was in white sheets and it was in my house and then we started making good friends...Hmm, and I knew maybe you were going to post today! ^.^ (don't freak out), hehehe, maybe I'm just weird. =P
    Have a blessed Ramadan...
    xxx

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  5. Before I left for vacation, I attended a couple of Iftar dinners in the KSA. I felt very welcomed. I did however get the wrong impression from what I had heard about it being a festival. The Iftar dinners I attended proved that to be incorrect, but many people told me it would be like a big party. I didn't see the bars during Ramadhan article, and I know its not politically correct to say so, but many, many Muslims here in the States do drink. Most who are converts usually do not, but many times I have seen students here for college or grad school in the seediest of bars. I used to work in bars and we always had a great number of students who would openly say that they were Muslim, but didn't have to follow the rules for the next 4 years. It wasn't until I got to Saudi that I learned that wasn't really true. They also commonly date western women at school when they are here. This doesn't make them bad at all, but it does beg the question: why?

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  6. I'm ignorant about this. Does the Qur'an say Muslims can't drink, or is that just a custom. For two thousand years Catholics couldn't eat meat on Fridays and then suddenly Church authorities said you could because Jesus never forbade it. Is it similar with Muslims and alcohol, or is it expressly forbidden?

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  7. I'm not Muslim but I don't drink. Stuff poisons the mind and body.

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  8. if you didn't know also in Bahrain !! so don't be shocked in this life not all Muslims are Muslims also non-Muslims also not like other non-Muslims

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  9. nowadays, many just don't really care...even the muslims drink and don't fast anymore..muslim who fasting will eat excessively during the iftar feast which in my opinion serve no purpose on the meaning of fasting!

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  10. I think I have observed this among the Muslims in North Africa. It is strictly prohibited to drink alcohol not only during Ramadan but all throughout one's life. It isn't to say that everybody observed this.

    I think the challenge is not on modernity and going against traditions, it would be good to know the 'why' behind not drinking alcoholic beverages.

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  11. With a lot of things there are those who pay lip service to sacred spiritual events however the benefits are in what you sacrifice or give.

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  12. u've raised a very good issue.missed ur posts.love and best wishes

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  13. Hi Izdiher ~~ Great article explaining your religion to all of us who know very little about it. The drinking of alcohol seems to get hold of so many that start out with it, and applies to all people and all religions. I don't drink myself, and I agree with you that cooking can be fun. And if we want to eat we have to cook. Take care my friend, Love, Merle.

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  14. Ikr ? I mean it's ramadhan! A month of forgiveness and mercy. Not parties -.-

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  15. Asalamu alaikum,

    JazakAllah khair for sharing and you correctly identify many issues may Allah safeguard us from intoxicants.

    Just wonder what your thoughts would be on The Lion Of Allah & The Martyr Of Martyrs ?

    Take Care

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  16. Good article as usual. Alcohol is the thing that is damaging societies across the globe, it breaks up friends, family and can be so destructive. Some people can handle alcohol but so many can't and the problem is when they are drunk they don't realise they are drunk and think they can handle it! I really admire celebrities who don't drink alcohol for non-religious reasons because they know it is dangerous for them!

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  17. Wow,I feel ashamed. Maybe I should talk a bit about my religion on my blog too :$ You`re an inspiration,Izdiher. You go,girl! :) That was so considerate of you,really :')

    P.S: And no,I don`t drink too :P Since I`m a Muslim too,Alhamdullilah :)

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  18. Missed your earlier post so writing here. Thank you for writing about issues close to your heart.
    In your last post you asked about newspaper reading-I prefer to read the newspaper in the "paper" format and never read news online because I still have some fascination left for old world charm.
    take care,

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  19. I was in Dubai and it is not so easy to get hold of alcohol, for instance there are no pubs or bars where you can drink. There are hotels. But Westerners should realise they are in a different culture, and it is not that difficult to have fun with out booze. Alcohol itself is a neuro toxin, that is how our bodies deal with it, when we 'get drunk' we are in fact poisoning ourselves. Big alcohol like Big tobbacco are rat bag drug dealers. You should read how they operate in other countries that have less stringent laws when it comes to how big business can operate. They hold big beach parties and give free samples to children with lots of music and balloons and local celebrities in order to make the drugs look fun to young people.

    In England we have a big problem with alcohol it kills roughly fifteen thousand people a year.
    And big Tobbacco and alcohol suppress the development of medical marijuana which has killed no one and helps cure cancer. In fact they did studies that showed college students who smoke a bit of marijuana drink less. So they funded the demonisation of the plant.
    When we think of marijuana we have a very warped view of it, this is directly as a result of marketing from these huge companies.

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  20. Some of my Muslim friends do booze here.. Even Muslim girls pal do booze and are also addicted to smoking :( Not all but there are some..

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  21. Thank you for writing about this, I'm a muslim too so I know what you mean.

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  22. Thank you for writing about this. In my own observation, Dubai is changing with the advent of industrialization and economic advancement. As the number of non-Muslims are proliferating the country, in a way, the cultures and traditions of the Muslims are starting to change as well. Am i right?

    As for my fellowmen, Dubai is an employment heaven. Much of my fellowmen discovered high paying jobs in Dubai to support their families. This is also the main reason why I have high respect for Dubai. Hopefully, I would love to see the place someday.

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  23. Hi Izdiher,

    Very nice post with good insights. Here in USA where it's overwhelmingly Christian, beliefs about drinking are all over the map. Generally, it's not drinking, but intoxication that's an issue. Anything to excess, you know? There are some sects (we prefer to call them denominations) that forbid it completely. To some Baptists and all Mormons, I think, driking is off limits. But at least to the Baptists, with whom I'm more familiar, this seems more a doctrinal than scriptural issue. Don't know about the Mormons, though. I was raised Catholic and Jesus drank wine so they're OK with alcohol. But then I think maybe the heavy Italian & Irish influence in the Catholic church may have something to do with that.:) As for the rest, I tend to think that the key is respect for the beliefs of others.

    Take care and keep up the wonderful work!

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